Current Impressions of the Institute

<p>With the Eppendorf Young Investigator Award, the Eppendorf AG honors outstanding work in biomedical research in collaboration with the scientific journal Nature. Thomas Wollert, group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried near Munich, Germany, was selected by an independent Award Jury for his groundbreaking studies to reveal how fundamental cellular transport processes are coordinated at a molecular level. The biochemist receives the 20,000 Euro prize for identifying mechanisms that drive intracellular recycling pathways. &ldquo;The award honors our efforts to study complex biological transport mechanisms in cells by reconstituting them from purified components in the test tube,&rdquo; explains Thomas Wollert. &ldquo;The results of our challenging studies provide the basis for the development of new therapies to treat human diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration.&rdquo; The official award ceremony with (invited) representatives from science, economy, and media will take place at the EMBL Advanced Training Centre in Heidelberg, Germany, on June 25, 2015.</p>

Naoko Mizuno is EMBO Young Investigator

November 30, 2015

With the Eppendorf Young Investigator Award, the Eppendorf AG honors outstanding work in biomedical research in collaboration with the scientific journal Nature. Thomas Wollert, group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried near Munich, Germany, was selected by an independent Award Jury for his groundbreaking studies to reveal how fundamental cellular transport processes are coordinated at a molecular level. The biochemist receives the 20,000 Euro prize for identifying mechanisms that drive intracellular recycling pathways. “The award honors our efforts to study complex biological transport mechanisms in cells by reconstituting them from purified components in the test tube,” explains Thomas Wollert. “The results of our challenging studies provide the basis for the development of new therapies to treat human diseases including cancer and neurodegeneration.” The official award ceremony with (invited) representatives from science, economy, and media will take place at the EMBL Advanced Training Centre in Heidelberg, Germany, on June 25, 2015.

Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry

 

Proteins are the molecular building blocks and engines of the cell, and are involved in almost all processes of life. The scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) investigate the structure of proteins and how they function – from individual molecules up to whole organisms. With about 850 employees coming from 45 nations, the MPIB is one of the largest institutes within the Max Planck Society. In currently eight departments and about 25 research groups, scientists contribute to the newest findings in the areas of biochemistry, cell biology, structural biology, biophysics and molecular science. They are supported by several scientific, administrative and technical service facilities.

 
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