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Dr. Gurumoorthy Krishnamoorthy
Neuroinflammation und Mukosale Immunologie
Phone:+49 89 8578-2464
Email:guru@...

MPI of Biochemistry,
Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried

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Lab news

Research Group "Neuroinflammation and Mucosal Immunology"

Autoimmune inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS) like in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), results from combined attack by self-reactive T and B lymphocytes which are natural components of the healthy immune repertoire. In most individuals, these lymphocytes remain innocuous throughout lifetime, but they can turn autoaggressive following pathogenic activation emanating from pathological presentation of the specific autoantigens and/or from innate immune responses against microbial structures. These processes seem to take place in peripheral tissues or in immune organs. Upon pathological conversion, activated lymphocytes overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB) and, with their pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, produce changes in the CNS tissue that ultimately translate into clinical disease.

In our research projects, by combining transgenic mouse models and cutting-edge technologies we approach questions of origin, development and regulation of CNS specific autoimmunity.

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Intestinal flora from twins is able to initiate multiple sclerosis

Berer, K., Gerdes, L. A., Cekanaviciute, E., Jia, X., Xiao, L., Xia, Z., Liu, C., Klotz, L., Stauffer, U., Baranzini, S. E., Kümpfel, T., Hohlfeld, R., Krishnamoorthy, G*., Wekerle, H*. (2017). Gut microbiota from multiple sclerosis patients enables spontaneous autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A.                                                                 *Corresponding authors

 
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